Woody – Brian & Joni Buzarde’s Tiny House

Altogether, Woody cost about $50,000 to build. The couple put Brian’s skills as a recent architecture school graduate to the test by designing it themselves. They decided early on that they would take on all of the construction work, too, even though they had no experience.” – Dwell

Read and see more of Woody, a tiny house built by Brian and Joni Buzarde at Dwell. Photos by Benjamin Rasmussen.

 

 

 

 

 

Loft-Topped Bathroom Block Converts Small Raw Space into Habitable Residence

The living spaces are formed around, within, and on top of the central volume. All told, the loft has a total of six different “rooms”; a kitchen-dining area, a living room, storage space, a bathroom, and a Mezzanine that caters for both working and sleeping.” – Humble Homes

This approach really simplifies the job of turning a raw space into a home. After finishing the exterior walls, simply build a bathroom block with a loft on top. The kitchen could also have been located on one of the block’s walls, simplifying and centralizing the utilities. Read and see more about A Small Loft in Camden by Craft Design at Humble Homes.

Inside an Ecovillage Tiny House

EarthSong Eco-Neighbourhood has long been at the cutting edge of sustainable design and urban permaculture. It’s for that very reason that it should be no surprise to discover that EarthSong is also now home to one of New Zealand’s first Tiny Houses.” – Bryce at Living Big in a Tiny House

 

Waterfront Cabanas in Portugal

Named Cabanas no Rio, which translates as cabins on the river, the two rustic structures offer a rural retreat for a pair of inhabitants.

One hut contains a living area, with a simple counter that can be used for preparing food, while the other accommodates a bedroom with a small toilet and sheltered outdoor shower.

Architects Aires Mateus used recycled wooden panels to build the walls, floors, roof and fittings of the two structures, leaving the material exposed both inside and out.” – Dezeen

Photography is by Nelson Garrido.

Short BUS Retro

Comprehensive restoration of a 1959 Chevrolet Viking short bus. Designed to safely travel 12 passengers and driver on the road, it converts to guest quarters for two as two single beds or joined in the center as a queen. Complete with plumbing (toilet and sink) and power (120v and 12v).”

See more at Winkelman Architecture

Casa Transportable ÁPH80 by Ábaton

Spanish architecture studio Ábaton has developed a micro home that can be transported on the back of a lorry and placed almost anywhere (+ slideshow).

Ábaton chose dimensions of nine by three metres to provide just enough space for two people and also allow the transportable house to be hoisted onto the back of a truck.

“The proportions are the result of a thorough study by our architects’ team so that the different spaces are recognisable and the feeling indoors is one of fullness,” said Ábaton.

Le Nuage by Zébra3/Buy-­Sellf

“French designers Zébra3/Buy-­Sellf have designed a prefabricated holiday home in the shape of a cloud that sits next to a lake in south-west France (+ slideshow).

Le Nuage (The Cloud) cabin by Zébra3/Buy-Sellf was designed for the Urban Community of Bordeaux (CUB)…”

Architecture Students Design Shedworking Spaces

Looks like the Ducks are making nests. (Sorry I couldn’t resist… I did one year of art grad school there… so I’m a little part duck too.) Go Ducks!

“The idea is to make creative space available in town on currently under used commercial or industrial locations as an investment in arts-based economic development. University of Oregon architecture students are working this spring to envision the possibilities for such a prototype.”

via Shedworking: Architecture students design shedworking spaces.

 

The Ephemeral Architecture of Burning Man

A preview of what might be seen at Burning Man.

“In about two weeks, the yearly event in the Black Rock Desert of Nevada (which is expected to host 60,000 people) will begin, and Black Rock City will burst out of the desert floor like a giant flower. During the last week of August until Labor Day, these residents (called Burners) will live in their own shelters that they’ve brought to the event. These shelters take on many forms: from berber tents and Monkey Huts to flamboyant RVs and festooned Costco carports. Black Rock City has it all.”

See more of The Ephemeral Architecture of Burning Man.