This Tiny House is a Showcase of Off-Grid Technology

Bryce Langston visits Paul and Annett in Australia in a remote spot near Byron Bay. Their tiny house is totally off-grid but is like a case study or showcase of a variety of off-grid technologies including:

  • The essential 1.86 kW photovoltaic electric power system with a 20 kWh battery system
  • A biogas system that makes methane for cooking. It converts 1 to 6 liters of table scraps and clippings into methane.
  • An evacuated tube solar hot water heater is their only source of hot water
  • Rain water collection and 10,000 liters of storage
  • Humanure composting toilet

Before the tiny house they lived in Sydney in an apartment, but they wanted to had a strong desire to live off-grid in a rural area. Inspired by Bryce’s videos online, they decided to build their own 8 meter (~26′) long tiny house.

In Australia the total maximum weight of the house is limited to 4.5 tonnes (~9,900 pounds), so they used all lightweight materials like steel for the home’s framing. It gives the house a slightly industrial look. The exterior is cypress and cedar. Pine is used for the windows and doors. The interior is lightweight plywood.

Through frugal choices and by doing a lot of the work themselves they kept the cost down. The total cost with all the high-tech off-grid features was just 65,000 Australian (~$50,000 USD).

To read more visit Living Big In A Tiny House. For more videos like this follow Living Big In A Tiny House on YouTube. Images are screenshots from the video by Living Big In A Tiny House including the selfie made by Paul and Annett. Also be sure to visit Paul and Annett’s website Living Tiny and Green.

Below & Above: The exterior of their tiny home where you can see most of the off-grid technologies. The tiny greenhouse looking thing is the biogas generator.

Below: A view inside their tiny home.

Alternative Power Generators for Off-Grid Tiny Homes

Portable alternative power generations like this one are handy during extended blackouts and can make good starter kits for some tiny houses.

The size of a system depends on what you need to run; for example if you just needs lights and communications a very small system will do. If you need to power a refrigerator, well pump, and/or clothes washer the system will naturally need to be bigger.

You can build solar systems yourself with all the necessary parts or buy prebuilt packages like the one pictured here to help you get started.

To learn how to build your own solar system I’ve linked a few how-to articles from other websites below:

  • Eartheasy Blog – Simple DIY Home Solar Power System
  • Mother Earth News – DIY Solar Power System Offers Easy Emergency Power Supply
  • Off Grid Quest – 4 Videos – A Small Introduction to DIY Solar

Learn more about the system pictured above…