Cozy Bed in Tony’s Hornby Island Caravan

As far as the layout, there was careful thought given by Tony about his possessions- what to keep, what to get rid of, and of the things he kept, where they should go. There were specific spots built for specific things- lot’s of open storage under the bed for his many instruments, cd shelves, book shelves, a shelf for magazine folders for his papers and so on.” – Tiny House Blog

Read more about Tony’s Hornby Island Caravan

Naked Snapper by Tortoise Shell Homes

Bill Kastrinos at Tortoise Shell Homes has been busy developing a longer steel framed tiny house. He calls it the Naked Snapper because it’s a naked shell ready to be completed by the buyer. Bill can finish it up for you or you can buy it as a DIY project. It measures 28-feet long and is built with steel framing which makes it super-strong and less heavy than all-wood construction. Learn more about the Naked Snapper at Tiny House Blog.

Contemporary Prairie Schooner

Libby and Tristan are building this lightweight (1000 pound) tiny house with a budget of $1,500 in Santa Fe, New Mexico. They plan to move into it this summer and make a move to New England. Most tiny houses are very heavy, much heavier than normal travel trailers. This project is extremely interesting because it pushes the envelope on how much can be done with little money and less weight. I’m certain their work will inspire many others to build similarly lightweight tiny homes. You can follow their progress on their blog called, Whittled Down.

Contemporary Prairie Schooner

Shelter 2.0

One of the most amazing designs I’ve seen recently for a prefab structure is Shelter 2.0. It was designed by Robert Bridges and Bill Young and is intended to be easily assembled from a small set of standardized prefabricated pieces. They’ve also released the designs under a creative commons license to make it easier for people to make use of this great new solution.

Shelter 2.0

These Bunkies Avoid Building Permits

I always like to hear about folks finding creative ways of solving housing needs. It’s not the beating the system part that interests me, although too often it seems like that is a requirement, which is really sad. Shouldn’t building codes be designed to protect folks… not limit or exclude folks? This article on Tiny House Blog describes one such work-around situation at Lake Ontario, Canada.

These Bunkies Avoid Building Permits