Shearwater Cove – An Off Grid Yurt Village in Alaska

The folks at Tiny Home Tours recently visited Jason & Charity at Shearwater Cove, who’ve built an off-grid yurt village in Alaska.

They found the land in the dead of winter and began building in 2015. Building on the land was tough. All the building materials in by boat and they used the boat dock as their initial work platform. The first step was to build decks, stairs, and bridges up and across the boulders, creeks, and rough terrain. This extensive decking provided easy access to the yurt platforms.

Today you can visit Shearwater Cove’s oceanfront yurt rentals and access to kayak adventures in Resurrection Bay and Fox Island. Shearwater Cove is just 10 miles from Seward Alaska but is only accessible by boat.

So if you feel like a tiny living adventure in Alaska consider checking out Shearwater Cove.

Photos via Shearwater Cove.

A Custom Weller by Four Lights Tiny House Company

Jay Shafer and Co. recently put the finishing touches on a custom Weller on wheels and the completed home is nothing short of magnificent. From the honeyed cedar craftsman style details to the signature red metal roof, Jays house designs are warmly inviting and beautiful to behold. ” – Four Lights Tiny House Company

Read and see more, A walk through a custom Weller

How to Create Extra Storage By Building Box Stairs

I know that many tiny houses today don’t have staircases in them because people opt for ladders instead; however, I don’t think ladders are a great option for several reasons. First and foremost, there’s nothing quite like having to climb down a ladder in the middle of the night to use the bathroom. Further, as the home’s inhabitants get older, the use of a ladder will likely become more and more difficult. The good news is that a staircase can work in the right size tiny home and the space underneath it can provide for a lot of storage…” – Andrew Morrison

Read and see how Andrew built a tiny house staircase…

Building a Roundwood Spiral Staircase

The completed roundwood spiral staircase
At last, I’m here to report that April and I accomplished building the round wood spiral staircase.  Over the course of five days, literally up to the day before we left Dancing Rabbit, we installed the risers and treads. The staircase design came from our dearest Tom Cundiff, who instructed us on the layout over the phone and in person during our last Timber Frame Workshop. It took us a while to fully grasp the layout and the flow of things, but once we fully understood the principles, it went fairly smoothly…” – Ziggy

See and read more at The Year of Mud…

Alternating Tread Stairway

Very nice implementation of an alternating tread stairway.

“I am not young and I don’t know how much longer I would be comfortable climbing stairs every day. So I did a lot a research and learned about alternating tread stairs (ships ladder, Thomas Jefferson stairs). If carefully designed, these stairs take up much less space than a regular stairway.”

Take a closer look at Tiny House Over the Hill: Stairs, etc.